Urine Test Detects Organ Transplant Rejection, Could Replace Needle Biopsies

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A T cell, here in purple, makes contact with a transplant organ cell, here in reddish brown. The T cell secretes the enzyme granzyme B, here in gray, which attacks the organ cell. But granzyme B also severs fluorescent signal molecules, in green, from the rejection detecting nanoparticle, in light pink. The signal molecules make their way into the urine, where they give off a fluorescent cue. Georgia Tech / EllaMaru Studio (work for hire, all rights GT, free for distribution).

A T cell, here in violet, makes contact with a transplant organ cell, here in brown and purple. The T cell secretes the enzyme granzyme B, here in gray, which attacks the organ cell. But granzyme B also severs fluorescent signal molecules, in green, from the rejection detecting nanoparticle, in light red. The signal molecules makes their way into the urine, where they give off a fluorescent cue.

Gabe Kwong, assistant professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory

Dr. Andrew Adams, associate professor of surgery at Emory University School of Medicine. Credit: Emory University

Graduate research assistant Quoc Mac is a member of the Gabe Kwong lab. Credit: Georgia Tech / Mac

Dave Mathews in a lab at Emory University School of Medicine. Credit: Emory University / Mathews