News

News Listings

Petit Institute researcher elected as councilor in American Chemistry Society

Understanding the biophysical cues provided by pathogenic particles may help fine tune vaccines.

Emory interventional radiologists collaborating with Georgia Tech Capstone students

Using super-resolution imaging, a Georgia Tech research team has observed the molecular reorganizations involved in phagocytosis.

An electric buzz to the vagus can fight chronic inflammation -- this fine-tune makes it even better.

The Georgia Institute of Technology will play a key role in a new federally backed initiative to advance medications made from cells, such as vaccines and autoimmune drugs, as well as therapies using living cells to treat a range of conditions.

Being married, with children, during graduate school presents unique challenges, as well as special experiences. 

APDC-supported CorMatrix, develops devices that can grow with the patient

Georgia Tech is advancing health informatics in ways that will affect the future of health care.

A new Georgia Tech effort aims at developing technologies for manufacturing therapeutic cells.

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In the News

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Electronic intelligence tracking cells might allow inexpensive labs on a chip to conduct medical testing outside the confines of hospitals and clinics.
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Georgia Tech researchers using cellphone principles to track cells being sorted on microfluidic chips.
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Patches developed by Georgia Tech and CDC could get life-saving vaccine to the people who need it most.
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Forest and research partners hope to turn the art of eavesdropping on brain cells into an automated technique.
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Six finalists (including team Wobble and Petit Scholar Ana Gomez del Campo), vying for InVenture Prize.
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Research from Nick Hud and collaborators reimagines the environment that gave rise to life.
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Petit Institute Associate Director Nick Hud and his collaborators are beyond biology to the role of chemistry in the development of life.

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