News

News Listings

Congratulations to the following faculty and staff members who were honored at the 2017 Faculty and Staff Honors Luncheon on April 21

Robert Butera Named Associate Dean for Research and Innovation effective May 1.

TINA and Hera Health using Round One experience to build for the future

Rob Mannino is poised to advance the field of mobile health technology

A new study shows how methane may have warmed the early Earth.

Startup supported by Atlantic Pediatric Device Consortium making it easier to detect harmless heart murmurs

A profile of 10 female roboticists

Alpha Kappa Psi (AKPsi) represents one of Tech’s premier co-ed professional business fraternity. Learn more about the organization and their events below.

The National Science Foundation creates podcast from Tech research.

A honeybee can carry up to 30 percent of its body weight in pollen because of the strategic spacing of its nearly three million hairs.

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In the News

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Scientists growing cells on the mirrors and image them using super-resolution microscopy to see structures of three dimensional cells with comparable resolution in each dimension.
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Stem cell factory opens, leading to organized clinical trials for revolutionary cell-based therapies.
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Fluorescent biosensors provide way to track mobilization of heme in cells.
Consortium develops national roadmap for advanced cell manufacturing, showing the way to cell-based therapeutics.
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Petit Institute researcher David Hu eloquently answers a U.S. Senator's criticism in a guest blog for Scientific American.
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Petit Institute researcher Omer Inan can listen to your joints. What he hears can used to determine what type of damage has occurred.
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From the lab of David Hu: Ants use their bodies to weave waterproof fabric to survive floods

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